J.D.R. Hawkins

One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

Archive for the tag “Stars and Bars”

Honoring a Great Man

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(Portrait by Theodore Pine, 1904)

Confederate General Robert E. Lee was born on this date in 1807. Lee is one of my favorite characters of the Civil War, and is featured in many of my books. He was so loyal to his homeland that he gave up his commission with the U.S. Army to support Virginia when the Commonwealth seceded from the Union in 1861. This could not have been an easy decision for him. He was career military, and he was President Lincoln’s first choice to lead the Union Army. But because the country was split, Lee went with his heart and declined Lincoln’s offer.

The war wasn’t kind to General Lee. He lost many relatives during the war, and told President Jefferson Davis several times that he did not want to lead the Confederate Army. Inevitably, the South lost, but Lee accepted defeat with grace and humility. He was offered the presidency at Washington College in Lexington, which he accepted. Only five years later, he died of pneumonia, presumably brought on by heart failure.

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Robert E. Lee was a true patriot and a devout family man. He held his religious beliefs above all else. His stamina and integrity are admirable, and his leadership ability carried his soldiers through many battles. His men idolized him with love and adoration, and compared him to King Arthur. Lee was one of the greatest generals in American history.

That’s why it is such a shame that the country he fought and suffered so much for has turned against his memory. New Orleans is still debating whether to destroy the statue erected in his honor in that city. This is recurring all over the South. It is disgraceful that such a great man is depicted now in such a dishonorable light. Lee never fought to defend slavery: in fact, he set his slaves free well before the war took place. He did not believe in the institution. He fought under the Stars and Bars to preserve Southern rights and freedom, and as a declaration that his soldiers would fight to save their homes. Lee’s home, Arlington, was taken away from him during the war, but he never wavered in his faith of God and country. It is disgusting how the Stars and Bars for which he fought have been removed from his Chapel and burial place. Shame on you, Virginia, for allowing it to happen.

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(General Lee on his horse, Traveller, 1866)

Would that his enemies squirmed in their shame…but alas they have none.

“The commanding general considers that no greater disgrace could befall the army than the perpetration of the barbarous outrages upon the unarmed and defenseless, and the wanton destruction of private property that have marked the course of the enemy in our own country.”

“It must be remembered that we make war only upon armed men and that we cannot take vengeance for the wrongs our people have suffered without lowering ourselves in the eyes of all whose abhorrence has been excited by the atrocities of our enemies…and offending against Him to whom vengeance belongeth.”

Robert E. Lee

 

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Hang ‘Em High!

Today has been designated National Confederate Flag Day by the Sons of Confederate Veterans. If you haven’t done so already, proudly hang your flag high for everyone to see! It can be any flag of the Confederacy: the Bonnie Blue, Stars and Bars, Stainless Banner, or the Confederate Battle flag.

As you can see, my little bloodhound is a true patriot of the South! Truth be told, I’m still unpacking, and it’s the only flag I could find right now, but you get the jist.

So fly your flag high, and tell the world you’re not afraid to show your Southern Pride! Happy Confederate Flag Day!

March 4 – A Day to Show Honor

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For those of you who are unaware, Tuesday, March 4 is Confederate Flag Day. So fly your Rebel flags with pride! The Southern Cross, Stars and Bars, Stainless Banner, Bonnie Blue Flag and others represent the noble Southern cause for which so many fearless men fought and died. These flags hold a hallowed place in history, and many suffered and rejoiced under the waving banners. These flags, contrary to popular belief, have nothing to do with racism, which today, is so easily misconstrued and dismissed as such. Unfortunately, certain hate groups have clamped onto the St. Andrew’s Cross as their symbol, but when the flag first originated, it was based on Scottish heritage.

Confederate Flag Day, sponsored by the Sons of Confederate Veterans, is a day when everyone everywhere is asked to honor the old flags. This observance should be made in remembrance, not hatred, and show homage to the past, for the flags’ meaning is far deeper and more profound that what modern day media depicts. The men who died under the flags – some ancestors, some old friends, and some distant relatives – all had the love of their land in mind when they fought. Out of respect, we should feel obligated to honor them by honoring their flags. So fly your Rebel flags on high!

Confederacy Reflected on Six States’ Flags

Following the Civil War, it was decided that each state should have a flag to represent itself, so in the late 1880’s the process began. Not surprisingly, many southern states chose to represent themselves with replicas of their beloved, albeit lost, Confederacy. Over the course of time, criticism and controversy have surrounded these states’ decisions, claiming that they are racist. The motto “Heritage Not Hate,” has received skepticism as to its sincerity, and whether it is a cover-up for racism underneath.

Alabama’s state flag is white with a red saltire cross, similar in design to the most recognizable flag of the Confederacy, the St. Andrews Cross, otherwise known as the Southern Cross. Florida also has a red saltire cross on its state flag. Mississippi has the only state flag that still bears the true replica of the Southern Cross. This design is in the upper left-hand corner, with the rest of the flag resembling the Stars and Bars. North Carolina also has a state flag that resembles the Stars and Bars, as does Texas, and Tennessee’s flag replicates the battle flag by its color scheme and design with a vertical bar on the fly that is reminiscent of the Stainless Banner. Two other states use similar colors in their flag designs: Arkansas and Missouri. Georgia received so much flack that it underwent numerous changes until finally deciding on a design that displays previous state flags.

It is fascinating to see how some state’s flags transformed over the years. Texas and Florida both started out with the Bonnie Blue Flag. Interestingly, California also had a lone star flag, although it was considered to be a part of the Union during the War Between the States.

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