J.D.R. Hawkins

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Archive for the tag “SCV”

Memorial at Shiloh

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Last Saturday, several SCV and UDC members traveled to Shiloh National Military Park to honor fallen Mississippians. A beautiful statue was erected last fall after years of the Sons of Confederate Veterans’ efforts to save up enough money. Mississippi was the only state without a statue at Shiloh up until last year.

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Many participated in a special remembrance of the soldiers who are buried in a trench somewhere on the battlefield. (The marker was placed near the estimated trench.) Some of my United Daughters of the Confederacy sisters were also there to honor their ancestors.

The Battle of Shiloh took place in Hardin County, Tennessee on April 6-7, 1862. Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston was killed during the battle. Casualties numbered nearly 24,000. It was the bloodiest American battle up until that date. The battle was a loss for the Confederates, and opened the door for Grant to continue his rampage through Mississippi.

(Photos Courtesy of Linda McGan)

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Georgia Under Fire

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Not surprisingly to me, all things Confederate have fallen under attack. This was prompted by the shootings at a black church last year by a racist lunatic who posed in a picture with the Confederate battle flag. It seems this was all it took to spark a wildfire of attacks on Southern heritage and history, using the excuse of racism as a cloak to destroy these treasures and force a hateful message of cultural cleansing on everyone. In Georgia, the following has been targeted:

The Chattooga County Commissioner has the flag display removed from the Confederate Monument on the County Courthouse grounds.

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The Georgia Department of Revenue pulls the Georgia Division, SCV specialty tags for all tag offices and halts the sale of the tags.
NAACP attempts to have the Bullock County Confederate Monument removed from the Courthouse grounds.
NAACP attempts to have the Jasper County Confederate Monument removed from the Courthouse grounds in Monticello.
NAACP and past City of Macon mayor calls for the removal of the Bibb County Confederate Monument in Macon to be removed.
Governor Nathan Deal has Robert E. Lee and Confederate Memorial Day removed from the State Calendar.

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The NAACP and the SCLC call for the removal of the Confederate Memorial carvings from Stone Mountain.
Liberal Activist in Rabun County attempts to remove the flag display from the Confederate Monument in Clayton, Georgia.
Representative DaLawn Jones of district 62, files House Bill 760 that would change Stone Mountain from being a memorial to the Confederacy and give the authority to state agencies to define and change monuments if they deem them inappropriate.
State Senator Vincent Fort of Atlanta files Senate Bill 294 that prohibits the recognition of public and legal holidays honoring, recognizing, observing, or celebrating the Confederate States of America, its history, or the military or political leaders thereof or the Civil War; to repeal the observing of Confederate History and Heritage Month.

All these attacks are nothing less than alarming and disrespectful. Lest I remind these politically correct activists that the items listed above are in honor of American veterans. Regardless of what side of the Civil War they fought for, they were designated as U.S. veterans decades ago. To try and take away the honor they earned and deserve is nothing less than shameful and selfish.

House Bill 50 has been filed in support of “protecting government statues, monuments, plaques, banners, and other commemorative symbols; to provide for related matters; to repeal conflicting laws; and for other purposes.” To read House Bill 50, check out:

http://files.ctctcdn.com/c6653e36501/948f936e-0920-40cb-9484-4458ec40fe3a.pdf

 

 

War Waged Against Everything Confederate in Florida

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According to a letter from David McCallister, the Florida Division Sons of Confederate Veterans Heritage Chairman, there are three pending initiatives in the Florida Legislature. Mr. McCallister believes these initiatives would greatly affect the SCV.

The most dire initiative would make it illegal for anyone in the state to display any Confederate flag or emblem on public property. This includes courthouses and courthouse squares, the Capitol, state parks, museums, libraries, cemeteries and parking lots.
It includes all Confederate flags, not just the battle flag that has recently come under attack across the country. The initiative also includes re-enactments, festivals, such as the Battle of Olustee, or Rifles, Rails and History in Tavares. If anything Confederate is displayed, citizens would have the right to sue.
The initiative is classified as Senate Bill (SB) 154 and House Bill (HB) 243. This is alarming, to say the least, because if these bills are passed, there will be no stopping such atrocities from happening in every state. It is an unfunded mandate from Tallahassee and is imposed on all other governmental entities of Florida. If passed, it could cost Florida residents millions of dollars.
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The second initiative is just as appalling. It proposes to remove the statue of General Edmund Kirby Smith as Florida’s representative in Statuary Hall in Washington D.C. This initiative was sponsored by a history teacher from Pasco County. Apparently, this teacher has never studied Southern history and has no idea who Smith was. The bills are HB 141 and SB 310.
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The third bill proposes to change the Florida State Senate Seal by removing the Confederate flag from the five historical flags display. The argument for this bill is that the CSA was not a sovereign nation, but this is false. The bill is SB 1026.
It is nothing less than shameful that certain politically correct special interest groups are pushing to remove all things Confederate, and thus, attempting to erase a significant part of Southern history and identity. The bills are offensive and discriminatory against Florida veterans and residents.

The Fight for Heritage Continues

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Last week, the Sons of Confederate Veterans won a major victory in Memphis, Tennessee, after a judge decided that they had the right to sue the city for changing the names of three parks. Forrest Park, named after Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest, was the primary subject of the suit, because the SCV had placed a large sign at the edge of the park designating it as “Forrest Park.” The city removed the sign without notice, and changed the name of the park to Health Sciences Park. They also did away with Jefferson Davis Park and Confederate Park, renaming them as well.

The ruling is a tremendous victory for Constitutional rights. To remove all things “Confederate” is a criminal offense and should not be taken lightly. Confederate veterans were designated as American veterans way back in 1906, when a Congressional Act was passed as a move toward reconciliation. To destroy or mutilate any veteran’s grave or marker is a Federal offense and should be treated accordingly.

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This goes hand in hand with trying to do away with the Confederate battle flag – the flag for which these veterans so gallantly fought. It is disrespectful to omit the flag from public view because it is misconceived by a few. This has happened at Washington and Lee University. In the chapel where General Robert E. Lee is interred, Confederate flags have been removed. The Confederate battle flag that flew above the Confederate soldier’s monument on the State Capitol grounds in Columbia, South Carolina received national attention a couple of months ago after a massacre took place by a lunatic at a church, and was also removed.

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Several schools around the country are debating whether or not to remove the flag. Although a small town in Virginia decided to retain the flag and their mascot name, “the Rebels,” and Gettysburg, South Dakota declined removing the Confederate battle flag from their town’s logo and police cars, other towns have caved under the pressure brought on by hate groups such as the NAACP. In Kentucky, the debate will continue later this month when board members discuss replacing the flag that was previously flying over an elementary school in Floyd County but was taken down.

Appeals Court Keeps Alive Confederate Parks Renaming Challenge

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Nathan Bedford Forrest’s statue and burial site are in Health Sciences Park, formerly named for the Confederate general. A state appeals court has kept alive the lawsuit over the renaming of that park and two others.

(Daily News File/Andrew J. Breig)

The Tennessee Court of Appeals has revived a legal challenge to the city’s renaming of three Confederate-themed parks with a Friday, Aug. 21, ruling that keeps only one of the 15 plaintiffs intact.

The case involves a lawsuit filed in 2013 following the Memphis City Council’s decision to rename Forrest Park, Jefferson Davis Park and Confederate Park. Shelby County Chancellor Kenny W. Armstrong dismissed the suit, ruling that the plaintiffs had not established that they had a standing in the case.

But in its Friday ruling, the appeals court said the Sons of Confederate Veterans Nathan Bedford Forrest Camp #215 does have standing and remanded the case back to Shelby County Chancery Court.

The opinion, written by Appeals Court Judge Brandon O. Gibson, upheld Armstrong’s dismissal of the 14 other plaintiffs, including descendants of Forrest, Sons of Confederate Veterans International and the group Citizens to Save Our Parks Inc.

The distinction, according to the ruling, is that the Forrest camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans “suffered a distinct and palpable injury not common to the citizenry at large” when the council voted to change the name of the park honoring the Confederate general, slave trader and Ku Klux Klan grand wizard. It’s new name is Health Sciences Park.

Gibson’s opinion specifically points to the chapter’s funding and installation of a 10-foot-long, 3,000-pound concrete marker at the edge of the park bearing the name “Forrest Park.”

The city’s removal of the marker was a pivotal moment that triggered a series of events, including a state law that bars renaming or removing monuments from parks that memorialize veterans and the wars they’ve served in.

Gibson also cited the SCV camp’s work in maintaining the park.

In a footnote, Gibson clarifies that the organization has standing to challenge the council’s action in renaming all three parks. But it notes the Chancery Court’s options include declaring the resolution invalid only in the case of the former Forrest Park, declaring the renaming of all three parks invalid, or upholding the renamings.

http://www.memphisdailynews.com/news/2015/aug/22/appeals-court-keeps-alive-confederate-parks-renaming-challenge/

(Article written by Bill Dries. Courtesy of The Southern Comfort, Sons of Confederate Veterans Private Samuel A. Hughey Camp #1452, Herando, MS, September 2015. Vol 39, Issue 9)

The End of Our Constitutional Rights

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Last Friday, U.S. District Judge Jackson Kiser ruled that Virginia can refuse issuing specialty license plates which display the Confederate flag. This happened in lieu of a recent Supreme Court ruling, stating that such a ban does not violate the First Amendment. This ruling primarily targets the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV), whose logo is the Confederate battle flag. Judge Kiser said he will issue a written order, addressing whether the approximately 1,700 Confederate license plates that have already been issued will have to be recalled.

After the Supreme Court ruling, state Attorney General Mark R. Herring’s office argued in a motion filed in June, “Accordingly, it is now the law of the land that States may decide, as the Commonwealth of Virginia did in 1999, not to place the Confederate battle flag emblem on their specialty license plates.”

However, attorney Fred D. Taylor, who is representing the SCV, argued that the Supreme Court ruling should not apply to Virginia, because the state doesn’t have a formal procedure for approving the content of specialty license plates. Therefore, specialty plates issued in Virginia could be interpreted as a form of free speech.

“Virginia has what I would call, a very much hands-off approach,” he said. “No one believes that, when I see a Virginia Tech Hokies, or a particular fraternity or a political opinion license plate, that that’s the government speaking.”

The SCV is now involved with a similar case in Texas, which has gone to the Supreme Court. In 1999, the SCV sued Virginia over the use of their logo on license plates. Two years later, Kiser (the same judge who presided over last Friday’s hearing) enjoined Virginia from enforcing the ban, and concluded that it restricted free speech. The U.S. Court of Appeals later upheld that decision, but after the shootings in June at a church in South Carolina, a flurry of chaos ensued in regard to the Confederate battle flag.

Virginia jumped on the politically correct band wagon when Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D) ordered the removal of the SCV logo from Virginia license plates, saying that the Supreme Court ruling gave him the opportunity to make that call. The governor stated that the Confederate flag is “unnecessarily divisive and hurtful.”

That may be true to some people, but not to others. Therefore, the ruling is discrimination. If one group is not allowed to use their logo, motto, or emblem, then NO groups should be entitled to do so. Fair is fair, and taking away the SCV’s right to proudly display their logo on specialty plates is unfair.

How Extremism Lead to Tragedy

Last Saturday, a rally in support of the Linn Park Confederate monument was held in Birmingham, Alabama. One of the speakers, Anthony Hervey, an avid supporter and writer who also happened to be black, was killed on Sunday while returning home to Oxford, Mississippi. According to Arlene Barnum, who was riding in the same vehicle with him, another vehicle pulled up beside them on the highway containing four or five young black men. They yelled and appeared to be angry. Hervey yelled back, but then lost control and crashed.

“It spun like crazy and we flipped, flipped, flipped. It was awful,” she said.

The Black Panthers are suspected as causing the fatal crash, and the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) are calling for a federal investigation into the matter. Not surprisingly, the story hasn’t been reported by any major news programs.

This tragedy isn’t enough to slow efforts by the NAACP to remove all things Confederate. Last night in San Antonio, Texas, workers removed what they thought were Confederate symbols from the Bexar County Courthouse just before midnight, following a unanimous vote taken yesterday by the commissioners’ court.

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However, in their haste, the workers failed to notice that one of the four plaques removed is actually an American Legion plaque. Therefore, Bexar County seems to be openly and willfully dishonoring all American veterans by their rash and dishonorable actions.

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San Antonio doesn’t have a problem with exploiting the Alamo for financial profit. I’m sure, if they tried hard enough, they could come up with something politically incorrect about this historic artifact as well. But instead, they chose to attack what they incorrectly perceived as Confederate symbols. The only plaque with a Confederate emblem on it is that of the United Daughters of the Confederacy’s (UDC) logo.

Confederate Memorial Service

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Last Sunday, the Samuel A. Hughey Camp 1452 Sons of Confederate Veterans held their annual memorial service at the Hernando Memorial Cemetery in Hernando, Mississippi.

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Many spectators were on hand to witness soldiers and the Color Guard march in. A prayer was offered, and a talk was given by Commander Randy Hailey about the origins of “Taps.” Afterward, two cannons fired off three rounds, and each round was followed by the soldiers’ firing off their guns. 

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Following the ceremony, everyone was invited across the street for a barbecue in Conger Park, courtesy of the Samuel A. Hughey camp. 

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