J.D.R. Hawkins

One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

Archive for the tag “Ole Miss”

The Mississippi State Flag Controversy Continues

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Regardless of the recent pressure Mississippi has faced to change its state flag, the governor and other legislators stand firm in keeping the design of their current flag. It is the only flag to still have the original Confederate battle flag on it, although nearly every other Southern state’s flag resembles one of the five Confederate flags.

The controversy over the flag, as well as all things Confederate, began with a fervor in June 2015, when whack job Dylan Roof, a supposed “avowed Confederate sympathizer,” committed mass murder. Prior to the tragedy, he stupidly posed with a tiny Confederate flag, and the photo was posted on Facebook before he committed his heinous crime. For some reason, the Confederate flag was to blame, as was everything else associated with the Southern cause, including monuments that have stood for a century or more in their respective places.

Mississippi Judge Carlos Moore proclaims that he will not allow the Mississippi state flag in his chambers. And many state-supported educational institutions, including Ole Miss, have stopped flying the state flag for politically correct reasons. Judge Moore says the flag is a “treacherous emblem,” and “stands for murder, rapings and lynchings of his ancestors.” (How a piece of cloth can represent all that is beyond me. We’d better do away with the Union Jack, then, and every other country’s flag, for all the horrible atrocities they represent from the past.) It seems Judge Moore can’t blame the true culprits, so he is indirectly blaming the flag instead. And he is attempting to use his power to do away with the Mississippi state flag.

He is publicly supporting Ms. Lauren Stennis, granddaughter of pro-segregationist Senator John C. Stennis. Lauren has created a different state flag. I won’t post a photo of her creation, because I think it’s ugly and unrepresentative of the great state of Mississippi.

Professor Diedre Owens says, “the flag of Mississippi should not include any symbols that have been coupled by hate groups or terrorist organizations.” (Excuse me, but doesn’t that include the Stars and Stripes? Yeah, it does.) She even goes so far as to compare Mississippi’s flag to Naziism. This is wrong on so many levels. Attacking Southern heritage by destroying monuments and changing flags is much more closely related to Naziism. We need to stop twisting the truth and embrace it instead.

The University Greys

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Following South Carolina’s secession from the Union, Mississippi seceded on January 9, 1861. Fervor about the impending war grew, with most thinking it would be little more than a skirmish that would last no more than ninety days. (If only they had been right.) Young men across the South gathered in preparation and formed militia-type military units. Once Ft. Sumter was fired upon in April, newly-elected President Abraham Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers to serve as “the militia of the several States of the Union…in order to suppress said combinations, and to cause the laws to be duly executed.” His actions only spurned more aggression, and Southerners felt they were left with no choice but to retaliate.

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On May 4, 1861, male students attending the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss), as well as many professors, joined the fight. Known as the University Greys, 135 young men enlisted in the Confederate Army as Company A of the 11th Mississippi Infantry Regiment. This was nearly all of the student body. In fact, only four students showed up for class the following fall, so the University closed for a time.

The University Greys fought in nearly every engagement of the Civil War, and participated in Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg, where they sustained a 100% casualty rate, in that everyone was either killed or wounded. Following Gettysburg, what was left of the University Grays merged with Company G, the Lamar Rifles, and fought until the end of the war.

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A special cemetery was set aside on campus for the fallen University Greys. Each grave was designated by a wooden marker. However, according to local legend, one day, a groundskeeper decided it would be easier to mow the grass if he removed all the markers. Unfortunately, once he was done with his chore, he couldn’t remember where the markers were supposed to go, so he stored them in a shed, where they were kept for years.

Although no one knows exactly where each soldier is buried, a large monument designates the sacred area and speaks of the sacrifices these admirable young men suffered. Every May, members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and other historical groups gather to pay their respects for the University Greys by holding a special service in honor of them.

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It’s a shame Ole Miss is consistent in forgetting how its students fought for what they deemed a worthy cause at the time. In recent years, the university has done away with its mascot, Colonel Reb, and has refused to fly the state flag. They have discussed removal of statues on campus as well as changing various street names honoring their brave warriors. Political correctness has taken precedence over historical remembrance. I certainly hope Ole Miss retains some of its amazing artwork, instead of caving in to political correctness and to those who wrongly deem all Confederate images as racist.

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https://civilwartalk.com/threads/memorial-window-to-the-university-grays-co-a-11th-mississippi.91879/

Farewell to Freedom?

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After watching the vice-presidential debate this evening, I feel it is more important than ever that we vote to defend our rights. Since 911, it seems the government has persistently whittled away at our freedoms. I understand going to extreme measures in order to secure our safety, but the recent attacks on freedom of speech and expression definitely surpass these measures. The following article about a game that took place a couple of weeks ago between Ole Miss and Alabama shows just how dangerous this political correctness is becoming.

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BREAKING: “Police Confiscate Flags, ‘Dixie’ signs at game. Threaten Arrest.” University of Mississippi – 9/17/2016

“Students attending the Ole Miss v. Alabama football game this Saturday at the University of Mississippi reported police confiscating Mississippi State flags and ‘Let the Band Play Dixie’ posters within Vaught-Hemmingway Stadium. University Police Officers were quoted by students as saying they were, ‘ordered to take all state flags and [‘Let the Band Play Dixie’] posters,’ that their orders came, ‘from the top,’ and that they would use their, ‘right to arrest,’ those who did not comply. United States flags and non-Mississippi State flag or Dixie related posters were not confiscated.
Our friends at the “Our State Flag Foundation” report that while they have no clue who organized the giant flag unveiling, it has led to a HUGE spike in on-campus membership, which has been steadily growing in the weeks since they were admitted as an official student group and were allowed to set up a table at the Student Union.
In addition, students are starting to speak out, with TWO excellent letters published recently in the DAILY MISSISSIPPI:
“Today at the game, my younger brother had a (Mississippi State) flag in his pocket walking in. A woman saw it, asked him if it was an American flag, then made him unravel it and took it when she saw it was a state flag. That’s absolutely ridiculous, but not as ridiculous as the fact that we have to smuggle the state flag into home games. Welcome to the dream school of Jeff Vitter , the University of Nowhere.” ~ Jack Vincent
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(Article courtesy of Dixie Heritage Newsletter, 9/30/16 ed.)

Pro-Flag Rally a Success

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On Tuesday, a rally was held in defense of the Mississippi state flag. Under sunny skies, Mississippians came together in defense of keeping their flag. Several hundred people attended the peaceful rally, which was held on the steps of the State Capitol Building in Jackson. This is contrary to what local reporter, Ross Adams of 16 WAPT News reported. According to Adams, only a dozen people attended, but this was far from true. The video link at the end of this post will attest to that.

The Sons of Confederate Veterans, among other pro-flag groups, invited the public to participate by flying their Mississippi state flags as well as their U.S. flags. The rally was held from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., and the crowd was entertained by a band and numerous speakers.

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“(We) want the Legislature to know (that) there’s a large grassroots support, still, to this day, as there was 16 years ago to keep the current state flag as it is and not change it,” said Ross Aldridge, who is a member of the Dixie Alliance.

The event was prompted after several schools, including state funded University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) and some cities chose to remove the flags for political correctness’ sake.

“The flag from Mississippi represents nothing but evil and dark times of black people over years and years,” said John Christopher Knight, who thinks the flag should be changed.

Mr. Knight seems to be overlooking the fact that Confederate soldiers were fighting to defend their homeland, not slavery. At that time in history, very few were fighting to free slaves, north or south. During the 1960’s, hate groups chose to use the Confederate battle flag as their emblem, and some people still associate that flag with racism. However, the battle flag is just that: a battle flag. Hate groups have also used the U.S. flag as their emblem.

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Mississippi lawmakers might take up the issue in the current legislative session, but so far, there has been no announcement that they will do so. The decision to keep the flag was made several years ago, and to re-vote on something that has already been decided is redundant. Lawmakers should vote on more pressing issues like state crime, industry, and poverty, instead of wasting time rehashing what has already been voted on by the people.

http://wapt.tv/6189BXfff

What’s Wrong With Ole Miss?

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USA, Mississippi State flag against sky

It seems that Ole Miss has committed a serious infraction against their Code of Ethics by removing the state of Mississippi flag from university property. Here is the code as it was written two years ago:

2013 Mississippi Code
Title 37 – EDUCATION
Chapter 13 – CURRICULUM; SCHOOL YEAR AND ATTENDANCE
IN GENERAL
§ 37-13-5 –

Display of Mississippi and United States flags; course of study

Universal CitationMS Code § 37-13-5 (2013)

(1) The flag of the State of Mississippi and the flag of the United States shall be displayed in close proximity to the school building at all times during the hours of daylight when the school is in session when the weather will permit without damage to the flag. It shall be the duty of the board of trustees of the school district to provide for the flags and their display.

(2) Whenever the flag of the United States is to be flown at half-staff by order or instructions of the President or pursuant to federal law, all public schools shall lower the United States flag in accordance with the executive order or instructions or federal law. The school shall announce the reason that the flag is being flown at half-staff to all students in assembly or by teachers in the various classrooms or by prominently displaying written notice throughout the school stating the reason that the flag has been lowered.

(3) In all public schools there shall be given a course of study concerning the flag of the United States and the flag of the State of Mississippi. The course of study shall include the history of each flag and what they represent and the proper respect therefor. There also shall be taught in the public schools the duties and obligations of citizenship, patriotism, Americanism and respect for and obedience to law.

Although there might have been minor changes made, the code is basically the same.

(Thanks to The Southern Comfort, Private Samuel A. Hughey Camp 1452, Sons of Confederates newsletter, volume 39, issue 11, November 2015.)

Mississippi Won’t Cave to Political Correctness (But Ole Miss Might – Again)

Recent debate about controversy surrounding the Confederate battle flag prompted several government agencies to remove the flag over the last few months. Sadly, South Carolina and Virginia, among other states, had the flag removed for various reasons, the most prominent being that it is supposedly interpreted as offensive to certain ethnic groups. Pressure came from racial hate groups, such as the NAACP and Black Lives Matter, to remove the flag and anything else associated with the Confederacy. However, they failed to sway the people of Mississippi.

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The state is the only one left that includes the Confederate battle flag in its banner. In 2001, the state voted, and the people decided by a wide margin, that the Mississippi state flag would remain as it was. After the political correctness influx of last summer, the state is still going to keep the same flag, regardless of threats from Congress to have it removed from government buildings. Governor Bryant has ignored the threats and is standing firm on keeping the flag the way it is. Good for him!

However, the University of Mississippi, or Ole Miss, isn’t as open minded. A small group of student senators has pressured the school to remove the state flag from the university. If this happens, there will certainly be repercussions. A state university denying the use of the state flag? The same state that is funding the school? Ludicrous!

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This isn’t the first time Ole Miss has given in to political correctness. A few years back, they decided to get rid of Colonel Reb as their mascot, and replace him with a black bear. Needless to say, Colonel Reb still lives on, despite what a few claim is “racist.” I’m sure their next attack will be on the beautiful monuments to Confederate soldiers that adorn the campus. Maybe they’ll even bulldoze over the cemetery, also on campus, that holds the graves of the University Grays, those brave students who went off to fight for the Southern cause. (During the Battle of Gettysburg and Pickett’s Charge, the University Grays sustained 100% casualties – all we either killed or wounded.)

It’s shameful that these cherished reminders of the Confederacy are gradually being swept away. When our history is lost, then it has the opportunity to repeat itself, and the government has the opportunity to take total control by removing our identity.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/10/20/us/ole-miss-state-flag-confederate-vote/

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/10/18/ap-mississippi-refuses-strip-confederate-symbol-state-flag/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social

No More Ole Miss? Shameful!

Here’s the latest slap in the face for those who cherish their Confederate heritage. The University of Mississippi is planning to make even more changes to their campus. A few years ago, the university dropped “Colonel Reb” as their mascot. (And what is the new one again? No one seems to remember or care.) According to USA Today, a new Vice Chancellor for Diversity will be named. The main road through campus, Confederate Avenue, is slated to have its name changed to Chapel Lane. And plaques will also be placed on Confederate monuments, which will state the historical significance of the statues. According to Chancellor Dan Jones, these are “racially divisive sites,” and he intends to “add modern context to their symbolism.”

Not only that: the name of the school, Ole Miss, will be phased out as well. According to Jones, there will be a defined shift in the common use of the nickname “Ole Miss” to closer identify with sports and school spirit. “Some faculty are uncomfortable with (the term “Ole Miss”) — either because they see it as a nickname or because they believe it has racial overtones,” said Jones. 

According to Grayson Jennings of the SCV Virginia Flaggers, “Ed Ayers, with whom Waite Rawls (of the museum formerly known as the Museum of the Confederacy) has worked closely over the last several years, and Christie Coleman, who runs the American Civil War Center at Tredegar, to whom Rawls sold out our museum, were named among those influential in helping Chancellor Jones to construct this program to eradicate our [Confederate] history and dishonor our Veterans. 

“Mr. Rawls remains a member in good standing of the Virginia Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans… while our Confederate treasures, so lovingly donated and collected ‘in eternal memory’ of our Confederate ancestors, are now subject to the same revisionist ‘modern interpretation’ that is already found at Tredegar, and is soon to be nailed to our Confederate monuments and markers on the campus of the University of Mississippi.”

Jones also said, “It is my hope that the steps outlined here – reflecting the hard work of university committees and our consultants – will prove valuable in making us a stronger and healthier university, bringing us closer to our goal of being a warm and welcoming place for every person every day, regardless of race, religious preference, country of origin, ability, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation or gender expression.” 

How is it warm and welcoming to those whose ancestors fought and died for their homelands? Some are even buried there, right on campus! What about how it offends us? I, for one, am appalled at this never ending assault on our heritage. It is unacceptable to appease one group of individuals by attempting to be politically correct without taking into account the thousands who it offends by erasing history. These attacks must stop. The Sons of Confederate Veterans are doing their best to fight off these attacks, but other groups need to get on board, like historical groups, heritage groups, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, the Military Order of the Stars and Bars, the Confederate Rose, etc. If we don’t stand up and start making noise about this, like the people who are achieving success in defaming these historic sites and symbols, it won’t end until they’re all gone.

For more info, check out:

http://hottytoddy.com/2014/08/01/chancellor-jones-announces-plan-for-leadership-on-race-issues-and-diversity/

Memorial Service Honoring University Greys

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Last Sunday, members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans University Greys Camp #1803 and the Varina Howell Davis Chapter #2559 United Daughters of the Confederacy congregated on the campus of the University of Mississippi to honor the immortal University Greys.

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The regiment (Company A of the 11th Mississippi) was formed at the onset of the Civil War by Ole Miss students who wanted to fight for the cause. Nearly all the student body enlisted (135), so that the school was forced to close. Sadly, very few made it back home.The most famous battle that the University Greys participated in was Gettysburg and Pickett’s charge, where the regiment sustained 100% casualties. 

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During the ceremony on Sunday, the Forrest Highlanders led a procession of infantrymen. Tom Wilson elightened the audience with his beautiful singing voice, and an invocation was given by a member of the University Greys SCV.

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The Honorable James L. Roberts, a judge from Pontotoc, Mississippi, delivered an intersting speech about his Confederate ancestors. A rifle and cannon salute commenced, followed by a floral tribute, where memorial wreaths were placed at the base of the monument that stands in the middle of the Confederate cemetery, and lists every soldier buried there.

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Following the service, a barbecue was enjoyed by all. Southern fare included brisket, fried chicken, boiled greens, catfish, fries, hush puppies, sweet tea, and banana pudding for dessert. The crowd also enjoyed wonderful bluegrass and gospel music.

Civil War Gun Show

Last weekend, the Southaven, Mississippi Arena hosted its annual Civil War Gun Show. The event attracted several hundred people, as well as dozens of vendors. Many Civil War buffs came out to see displays of guns, artifacts, collectors items, and artwork, as well as old books and new authors selling their titles.

The local Sons of Confederate Veterans Samuel Hughey Camp was represented during the weekend. It was a great opportunity to see unique historical artifacts and meet Civil War enthusiasts. We even had a chance to vote for the re-instigation of Colonel Reb as mascot of Ole Miss!

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