J.D.R. Hawkins

One bullet can make a man a hero… or a casualty.

Archive for the tag “horses”

Guest Post by Amy Lara

From time to time, I feature guest posts to help other authors out. Here is another guest post that I thought you would enjoy.

Which is better – wooden horse barns or metal horse barns?

When the time comes to build a new horse barn on your property, you’ll have a few crucial considerations. First, you will need to pick where the barn will be, how big it will be, and more. In this essay, we’d like to look at another essential option in this process–the material you will use to create the barn. There are two primary alternatives accessible today, wood and metal, and both may give some great perks. Let’s analyse the benefits and downsides of a metal barn over a wood barn.

While many iconic pictures of horse ownership contain wood barns, the barn marketplace has transformed to keep up with demand. For years, wood was the primary building material for barns, storing it in our memories as the “best” barn material.

Why are metal barns better than wooden barns?

Metal Barns are Flexible

Custom Metal barns designs are entirely adjustable depending on your needs and budget. For example, maybe you have enormous horse barns ideas down the line. Metal horse barns can cost-effectively grow with your horse family in the future. Unfortunately, wood structures do not give the same flexibility and are significantly more expensive.

Maintenance

Wooden horse barns are not very weather resistant over time. They are vulnerable to rotting, mold, warping, cracking, termite damage, and other difficulties that will require a large amount of maintenance. It alone could tip the scales if you are investigating metal barn designs. You can also plan to paint and varnish your wooden horse barn every few years. 

Safety

Any exposed metal might hurt a horse if the animal kicks it or becomes entangled in it. For example, while placing kickboards on interior walls might protect horses where kicks are most prevalent, horses can suffer significant lacerations anywhere exposed metal is present. For safety, the point has to go-to wood.

Metal Barns Have Room To Grow

Metal horse barn designs help you create what you need or can afford right now without hindering your potential to grow in the future. Unfortunately, standard wood construction cannot give the versatility of a metal horse barn.

You’re not losing safety simply because it’s easily extendable. Metal and steel horse barn kits endure extreme weather. Our designs are so solid that we provide a 50-year structural warranty.

Weather and Fire Resistant

One of the significant reasons to acquire a horse barn is to shelter horses from the weather and offer them a stable area for feeding and maintenance. Your barn will give a location where they may escape from the outdoors and feel comfortable even during harsh winter weather and the through the heat waves of summer. It should also protect them from fire.

Wood may damage by water, but moisture management in metal buildings is easy to maintain. Metal barns do not get damaged by water. In dry climes, barn buildings water through barn misting systems and evaporative cooling. Throughout years of water exposure, steel will exhibit little to no damage, whereas wood will break down and deteriorate.

Durable

Wood has demonstrated its ability to stand up to Mother Nature, but metal structures with steel trusses are significantly more robust. The straightforward span truss design implies that you won’t wind up in a claustrophobic environment. You’ll love the absence of flat ceilings, which provide more useable internal space. So go ahead and place a gambrel roof on your design for maximum effect.

It establishes the primary interior frame convention that gives you the ability to complete the interior with doors and windows. You can even insulate with standard batt-style insulation.

Sustainable

While some horse owners will always select wood, there are many compelling reasons to go for metal horse barns; one of the most prominent arguments is sustainability; metal structures are today’s green construction alternative.

Conclusion

Many homeowners frequently become overwhelmed while picking between horse metal barns and wood structures. Naturally, metal and wood are fundamentally different materials, and they have their pros and downfalls, which you must evaluate. However, there are additional crucial variables to consider before picking, such as your budget, durability, strength, and maintenance cost.

Although wooden constructions are appealing, they may not give you long-term benefits like steel buildings. Many homeowners frequently become overwhelmed while picking between metal barns and wood structures. Naturally, metal and wood are fundamentally different materials, and they have their pros and downfalls, which you must evaluate. Before you pick, there are additional crucial variables to consider, such as your budget, durability, strength, and maintenance cost.

Although wooden constructions are appealing, they may not give you long-term benefits like steel buildings, above some of the advantages of metal barns over traditional wood buildings that will help you make an informed selection.

Rave Review for Horses in Gray

This review appeared a while back in the Sons of Confederate Veterans magazine, the Confederate Veteran. I neglected to post it on my blog at the time it was published, so here it is now.

Off to the Races!

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This Saturday (my birthday, BTW), the Belmont Stakes will take place, and after five years, we may have a chance to see another triple crown winner with a magnificent three-year-old colt named Justify. This is so exciting, and I really hope Justify wins! I love watching horse races, because each event happens so quickly, and the horses are so beautiful to watch when they run around the track and cross the finish line.

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Our modern-day horse races originated from the Civil War, and the first Kentucky Derby was held on May 17, 1875. This was ten years after the war ended. Prior the war, Southerners relished racing their beautiful Thoroughbreds. When the war broke out, cavalrymen still held races for amusement, and placed bets in hopes of making a profit, although they were betting with small items and valueless Confederate currency.

Here is an excerpt from my novel, A Beckoning Hellfire, describing one such race.

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On the morning of April 25, following roll call and breakfast, David saddled Renegade. He and Jake walked over to the wide, emerald field designated as the race course. No one else had arrived, so they said a quick prayer for the safety of horse and rider and for the chance to show the other cavalrymen in Rooney Lee’s brigade just how fast a little horse from the back hills of Alabama could run. Talk of the race had spread from company to company until the entire brigade caught wind of the event, and several other riders expressed interest in racing as well. This didn’t worry David in the least, since he’d been racing Renegade for nearly a year at every opportunity that presented itself in Morgan County. They had always won.

He checked Renegade’s legs for heat or swelling. “Tell me again which regiment you’ll be with,” he said to Jake.

“The 26th Alabama, under Colonel O’Neal,” Jake replied. “Reckon when I git over there, they’ll issue me a haversack.”

“You’ll be needin’ somethin’ better to walk in,” David observed, glancing down at Jake’s dusty riding boots.

“These’ll git me by for a while.” Jake kicked a stone. “At least until I can locate me a pair of brogans.”

He looked across the field, and David followed his gaze. Men on horseback approached, along with a crowd of soldiers on foot. Two troopers fashioned a finish line constructed of a thin rope at the other end of the field. The crowd grew louder. David and Jake walked toward the commotion.

“Are you in the race?” a young soldier in gray asked.

David nodded.

The soldier pointed at the starting line, which was also to serve as the finish line. David stepped into the stirrup and mounted.

“Good luck, Zeke!” Jake yelled. Removing his slouch hat from his head, he waved it in the air.

David grinned. He directed Renegade over to the starting line, took his place on the end, and glanced over at the other six horses. They were all taller and more muscular than his little colt. Their riders turned to sneer and chuckle at him. David touched the brim of his hat in response. Two fiddlers commenced to play “Camptown Races” in harmony.

“Gentlemen,” an officer announced, a pistol in his hand. “When I fire, y’all are to ride around the edge of this field, counterclockwise, which is a quarter of a mile in length, until returnin’ to this spot. Anyone cuttin’ across will be disqualified. Good luck, and may the best man win!”

The crowd cheered. At the outburst, some of the horses grew frantic and reared. The officer raised his pistol into the air and fired. Renegade sprang, easily pulling ahead in great stretches, his hooves thundering against the ground in rapid rhythm.

David lowered himself close to the horse’s neck. Out of the corner of his eye, he saw two other riders closing in on him. He held Renegade back until he thought they were about three quarters of the way around the track. One of the other riders jeered at him, yelling about how that homely spotted pony couldn’t outrun his steed. David let him pull ahead by a length.

The horses grunted with each stride, their hoof beats drumming down upon the turf in quick cadence. The riders whooped and hollered to make their mounts go faster. A couple of the contestants thrashed at their steed’s flanks with sticks.

David glanced back over his shoulder. The other five horses were close at his heels. He looked ahead and spoke into Renegade’s ear, using every ounce of love and trust between them to coax the stallion into giving his all.

“Okay, Renie! Let ‘em have it!”

He slapped Renegade with the ends of the reins. The little horse surged forward, ever faster, easily passing the rider in front of him. He pulled far into the lead and galloped toward the crowd of people. David’s heart thumped in his ears with exhilaration as the wind whipped his face. Horse and rider burst through the finish line. The spectators cheered. The six other contestants came in five lengths behind. David eased back on the reins, letting his horse slow to a trot. He walked Renegade back to the finish line where a mass of soldiers swarmed around.

“That was some race!” one exclaimed.

“I never expected this funny-lookin’ one to win!” said another.

“Summers, I don’t reckon I ever saw a horse run that fast!” John yelled. “And you jist won me five dollars!”

David grinned, removed his hat, and brushed his damp hair back from his forehead. He looked around for Jake who was standing near the back of the crowd with his arms folded in front of him, smiling and shaking his head.

“Private Summers.” Colonel Beale rode up to him on his horse. “Congratulations! That was remarkable!”

“Thank you, sir,” David replied.

“General Stuart would like to have a word with you.” He pointed to a knoll at the other end of the field. David looked over to see four officers on horseback.

“With me?” he asked, awestruck.

The colonel smiled and turned his horse. David rode alongside toward the other end of the field. As he neared, he recognized two of the officers immediately. One was General Rooney Lee, whom he had met upon his arrival, and the other was General Stuart, the commanding officer of the Confederate cavalry. David had eagerly anticipated catching a glimpse of the legendary general but had never considered meeting him in person. Riding up onto the knoll, he saluted modestly. The officers returned the gesture.

“This is Private David Summers, who jist recently jined us from Alabama,” General Rooney Lee explained, his eyes twinkling. “He’s with the 9th Virginia.”

“Private Summers,” said General Stuart. “I am very impressed with the way you ride.”

David was astounded by the man before him. General Stuart wore a gray jacket with gold braiding in the configuration of the Austrian knot on his collar and sleeves, a wide yellow sash around his waist, elbow-length gauntlets, dark blue trousers with gold stripes, a red-lined cape, and golden spurs attached to his high riding boots. On his head of curly brown hair perched a wide-brimmed gray felt hat, turned up on one side and clasped with a gilded palmetto star. A black ostrich plume feathered out from behind it. His tanned face was covered with a light brown moustache flowing into a cinnamon-colored beard that reached down to his chest. His bright blue eyes sparkled from beneath the brim of his hat as though laughing at the world and amused with everything in it.

“Thank you, sir,” David said.

“This is Colonel Von Borcke.” General Stuart motioned toward a large man on his left with a long, blond, curly moustache and short beard. “And this is Major R.C. Price,” he introduced, nodding toward the young man on his right, who didn’t look much older than David.

“I would like to have the opportunity to race your little stallion in the near future,” Colonel Von Borcke said with a heavy Prussian accent. “I’m certain that my horse will win!”

The officers chuckled.

David grinned. “I’d be honored, sir,” he replied.

“Private, I would like to take the opportunity to use you as need be for special assignments,” said General Stuart. “That is, for errands where speed will be of the utmost importance.”

“Yessir,” David said.

“I assume your horse is sound,” said the general.

“Yessir.”

“And you are willin’ to take certain risks for the good of your country.”

“Yessir.”

“Very good, Private. It is my opinion that a good man and a good horse can never be caught, and you have displayed admirable qualities.”

David grinned with delight. “Thank you, sir.”

“You are dismissed,” the general said.

David saluted. General Stuart put his gloved hand to his hat and smiled slightly. He released the salute. David turned Renegade toward the base of the knoll.

“Congratulations on your victory,” General Stuart called after him.

“Thank you, sir!” David called over his shoulder.

He spurred Renegade into a trot across the field. All the while, his heart was rapidly thumping. He couldn’t wait to tell Jake about what just happened. Now he truly was one of Stuart’s “invincibles.”

The crowd had thinned, but Jake waited beside the officer who had fired the starting gun.

“Zeke!” he yelled. “Git over here and collect your winnin’s!”

David looked at Jake quizzically and coaxed Renegade toward  his friend.

“Here you are, son,” the officer said. He handed David a one hundred dollar Confederate note. “Congratulations! I hope we git to see that little horse run again soon!”

David’s eyes grew wide in astonishment. “Thank you, sir!”

He stared in exhilarated awe at the note that read, “Confederate States of America, one hundred dollars.” Pictures of two soldiers, a woman’s face in profile, and a man he assumed to be a politician were displayed on the front of the scrip. He hadn’t expected to win anything, especially not this much money. His only desire had been to race for the recognition and to rectify Renegade’s bad behavior in front of his company.

Glancing back at the knoll, David saw that the officers had gone, and with them, his moment of glory. He sighed, dismounted, and walked alongside Jake back to camp.

 

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